Made to Measure Magazine

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NorthJersey.comBill to limit gun magazine size heads to Christie's deskNorthJersey.comThe New Jersey State House. On Thursday, the bill made it out of the Legislature after its supporters won a 44-34 vote in the Assembly. It now heads to Governor Christie's desk, where it faces an … They said on Thursday that they still support a …and more »

Questions and Answers

At what dpi do magazines usually print at? Dpi vs. Resolution?

Those pictures in vogue, jpg, nylon…etc. What dpi do they print at?

Also another question what is the difference between dpi and resolution? Or is dpi a unit of measuring resolution? Im kinda confused hereee.

Posted by CB
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Magazines are printed with offset printing which is different to CMYK printing, but the underlying printer file will usually be 300dpi.

DPI is the printers resolution, as an example, if the printers resolution is 300dpi and you print a 10" X 8" picture then the printer will print a matrix of 3000 dots X 2400 dots (10" X 8"multipliedd by 300). 300dpi is the standard resolution for commercial printing, it's not a 'magic' resolution it's a compromise between speed of printing and ink usage.

300dpi gives a pretty good print quality with normal viewing, but it is possible to alter the DPI of the printer to print a finer or coarser matrix, this is one advantage of home printing.

If you think about it you need a higher resolution with small prints than you do with larger prints. Imagine a picture the size of a postage stamp then to include all the detail in the file the printer would need to print to a much finer matrix, it would need to print at a higher resolution.

The confusion arises because people (some of whom should know better) insist on using DPI when they really mean PPI (pixels per inch). PPI is the resolution the computer uses when it plots the picture file to the screen or prepares the file for the printer.

When preparing picture files for printing the photographer alters PPI to determine how big the file will print, this will vary with different file sizes (usually determined by the cameras sensor resolution) and different print sizes and has little relationship to DPI at all.

With commercial printing DPI is fixed, the size of the dot is fixed, but on the computer PPI works by altering the size of each pixel.

What programs such as Photoshop or similar do is match the files matrix to the printers matrix. To do that we alter the resolution used by the computer (PPI remember).

Back to our example 10" X 8" picture, if we are having this commercially printed @300dpi the printers matrix is fixed at 3000 dots by 2400 dots.

A file matrix of 3000 X 2400 equals a camera sensor resolution of 7.2Mp exactly, so a file from such a camera would print one pixel per dot and all the information in the file would be reproduced by the printer. Any more information say from a 10Mp camera would be dumped as you can't have two pixels in one dot.

This is sometimes referred to as the Megapixel Myth, yes there is more detail in the file but printing at (in this case) 10" X 8" won't use it all, any extra detail will just be dumped, it would be even worse for a smaller print. Print larger or crop some of the pixels away and still leave enough pixels for a decent print are the only advantage of more Mp.

Chris.

Do you think magazines may be the best tools as educative measures?

Posted by SWARNIMA
[display_name id=”1″]

Yes,good magazines may be the best
mode as an effective tool for educative
measures to impart eductation.

Sainsburys magazine easter chocolate cake help!!!!?

I made an easter chocolate cake from one of the sainsburys magazines last year and it was fab but i no longer can find the magazine and think someone might have thrown it away!!!! Ive tried looking online but to no avail – i do have a pic of it but dont know how to add it. Thanks.

Posted by wanabepopstar
[display_name id=”1″]

Yield
8 servings
Measure Ingredient
175 grams Butter; softened (6oz)
175 grams Golden caster sugar; (6oz)
3 mediums Size eggs
1 teaspoon Vanilla essence
3 Rocha pears; peeled, cored and
; chopped
175 grams Self-raising flour; sifted (6oz)
50 grams Deluxe dark chocolate; (2oz)
1 teaspoon Icing sugar; sifted

Preheat the oven to 160øC/325øF/Gas Mark 3. Cream together the butter and sugar until pale and creamy. Gradually beat in the eggs, mixing well between each addition. Stir in the vanilla essence and pears. Fold in the flour, then spoon the mixture into a lightly greased 1 litre (2 pint) ring tin or a deep 20cm (8 inch) cake tin. Bake in the preheated oven for approximately 50 minutes – 1 hour, until golden and firm to the touch. Allow to stand in the tin for 5 minutes, then turn out onto a wire rack until cold. Melt the chocolate and drizzle over the cake. When set, dredge with icing sugar
******************************************************************************
Measure Ingredient
65 G; (2 1/2-3oz) butter,, (65 to 70)
; plus extra for
; greasing
75 grams Caster sugar; plus an extra
; heaped teaspoon
; (1-2 x 5ml spoon)
; (3oz)
1 Egg
150 grams Plain flour; (5 oz)
4 fluid ounce Semi-skimmed milk; (110ml)
A few drops of vanilla essence
1 Heaped teaspoon baking powder
1 Heaped teaspoon cinnamon
1 Heaped teaspoon cocoa powder

Preheat the oven to 190øC, 375øF, gas mark 5. Beat together 25g (1oz) of the butter and the 75g (3oz) caster sugar. When they are fully creamed, beat in the egg, and then the flour, milk and vanilla essence by turns. Beat in the baking powder with the last of the flour. Pour the mixture into a buttered, shallow 8-inch (20cm) sandwich tin and smooth, banking slightly to the outside. Bake in the oven for about 30 minutes, testing to see if it is done with a fork or skewer. When the tea cake is cooked, take it out of the oven, invert it on to your hand or a plate and then on to a cake rack, so that it is the right way up. Mix together the extra spoon of sugar, the cinnamon and the cocoa. Butter the top while it is still warm with the remaining 40-50g (1 1/2-2oz) butter, and then sieve on the remaining mixed dry ingredients. Cut into 8-10 slices and serve, whilst still warm if possible.

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